AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

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PVDaddy
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AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Fri Mar 01, 2013 12:34 pm

AGENDA 21 Joseph M. Maxwell

Abstract

The following pole vault model represents this author's attempt to describe and clarify what he feels are critical elements of what was perhaps the greatest vault in human history. Because this vault was performed by Sergey Bubka--the student of world famous coach Vitaly Petrov--this vault certainly represents the Petrov Model and Bubka's attempt at its perfection. This Agenda attempts to describe this single isolated vault and no two vaults are exactly alike, but are what Alan Launders so eloquently coined, a "one-off." No one can deny, however, that this "one-off," was one excellent vault! Because pole vaulting is indeed a continuous chain of events, with each event impacting the next, it goes without saying that if one has not perfected the former, they will not have the same set of circumstances in the latter. My objective is that this Agenda will stir up some new ideas that coaches and athletes might not have yet considered toward their attempts at perfecting their craft and/or to bring consensus to areas of the vault they thought to be true, but may have not yet employed in their training This Agenda describes some specific elements (Many of which are not mentioned in Petrov's Model, but, were demonstrated by Bubka) that this author believes are imperative, if one is to have a chance at vaulting 21 feet. I do believe there is one best model for the majority of vaulters and a great need for consensus among coaches and vaulters, if the Pole vault world is going to move forward and break a new world record.


Definitions:

Pole selection: a pole must be selected to meet the ideal resistance required to completely uncoil at true vertical at the exact time the vaulter begins fly-away (see Fly-away below for definition and proper pole selection).

Fly-away: Flyaway is defined as beginning at the moment the bottom hand leaves the pole.
The pole is no longer propelling the vaulter in this phase. The vaulter adds the last share of energy with the top-hand push, and then begins free-fall as gravity is now the only force in action.

Free Take off: A Free take of would be a take off (leaving the ground from the take of leg (jumping) without interference from the resistance of a coiled pole (Pole would be concave from its own weight or at minimum straight at plant.)

Pole loading: Pole loading is the Kinetic energy generated during Run up that is transferred into the pole at Take off (causing it to bend and rotate to vertical) and stored as Potential energy which is later transferred to the vaulter as kinetic energy at Flyaway.

Negative Inversion: When the vaulter is upside down just prior to flyaway, with the angle of the spine to the left of (behind) vertical, leaning toward the runway. Becoming extra Inverted.


This author believes that the Petrov model describes the ideal Pole carry, Run up, and Plant (First Phase), it needs however, to be described in greater detail.

The following link is an excellent article Written by David Butler and describes the Active (Gravity) pole dop, 3 step Plant, and Free take off better than anything I have found. http://www.nacactfca.org/Butler%20pole% ... n'%204.doc

Petrov showing the proper position of the hands and arms during the last 2 steps of the plant and into take off, in order to achieve a Free take off, at at a speach he gave in Reno in 2005.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMUQaWfAx48&feature=gv

The majority of kinetic energy generated during the vault occurs at run up and is maximally transferred to the pole (Pole loading) with a Free take off into the stretched inverted C position, it is imperative that this phase of the vault be mastered!

A vaulter must always strive for a Free take off into the stretched inverted C position. Frames 2:56-3:04

Pole loading: Pole loading begins the moment after take off. The vaulter at this stage of the vault must make no effort to pull or swing on the pole but must continue to reach (Stretch) for the sky, chest forward leading the way through the arms, with the bottom arm elbow facing out, as the bottom arm is being taken upward (Continues to straighten indicating no pulling effort being made) into an elastic stretch of the shoulder girdles, allowing the full force of the run up speed and take off to be maximally loaded on to the Pole. When the force of the vaulters body is loaded onto the pole (from the top hand), the pole will bend, and the vaulters body will also bend, into the stretched inverted C position. This Places the vaulter in the most ideal position for the swing and allows it to occur elastically (immediately) with maximum effectiveness.

Frames 3:39-3:50


The Major additions to the Petrov model (Beside what Butler in his article, and Petrov in his Reno speach, further clarify) this author is making in this model are in regards to the off-the-ground phase of the vault (second phase), and mainly concern the use of the Trail leg, Abdomen, and the Bottom and Top Hand.

Relaxation and Elevation of Trail leg: At the very end of Pole loading both legs must be momentarily relaxed allowing the trail leg to be elevated (heel toward the sky with knee bending) in order to increase the swing distance and speed of The Whip ( As if one were kicking a soccer ball).

Frames 3:43-3:47

The Whip: The most amount of energy added to the vault during the second (off-the-ground) phase is The Whip (Whipping up action of the trail leg). The whip begins immediately from the Elevated trail leg out of the Stretched inverted C, and continues to the top of the pole. All effort must be made to generate as much speed and energy throughout the whip as possible!

Frames 3:39-3:50

Abdomen Pull: There must be a very strong abdomen pull (Pelvic thrust) of the hips and legs, that begins the moment the whip (Trail Leg) comes out of the downswing (and into the upswing), in order to maximize whip speed and propulsion of the hips and legs upward into the upswing.

Frames 3:49-3:54

Use of the bottom hand:

The bottom hand performs both a pulling tension ( a downward tension created through the shoulder) and then a pushing action. Both add energy to the vault. Both actions are critical to this model.

The bottom hand must perform the pulling tension (A downward force created through the shoulder) at the appropriate time. The appropriate time to begin the pulling tension would be immediately after the Abdomen Pull in the whip and coincides at the exact time the vaulter breaks at the hips, the pulling tension must continue through inversion as the hips and legs are propelled upward. This adds speed to the whip and also gets the vaulter to inversion quicker out ahead of the uncoiling pole.

Frames 3:53-3:56 and Frames 4:32-4:45

The bottom hand must perform a very strong push toward the pit! Just like the top hand does, but in this instance the wrist is bent around the pole. This positions the vaulter in the air (Fly-away has begun) for the turn and all important top hand push and adds critical energy (to the fly-away as it assist in adding additional vertical energy). The bottom hand release (after bottom hand push) must occur simultaneously with the final straightening of the pole. The fact that the vaulter is applying maximum downward pressure, while increasing his grip on the pole, at this perfect time, insures that the maximum amount of kinetic energy from the pole is transferred into the vaulters body.

Frames (Note timing of release) 5:03-5:11

It is very important to note that this author does not intend to suggest the bottom hand puling tension and bottom hand push as two separate entities. Conversely, the object is to seamlessly blend the bottom hand pull directly into the bottom hand push as the bottom hand crosses the plane of the chest. This changes the direction of the force exerted by the bottom hand from towards the body, to away from the body--aiding in the overall objective (going up) the entire time!

Use of the top hand:

The top hand performs both a strong pulling action and then a strong pushing action. Both add energy to the vault. both actions are critical to this method.

The top hand pull begins simultaneously with the bottom hand pull (at the moment one breaks at the hips). They work together, similar to one swinging there hips to the top of a high bar. However, the major pulling effort must be made by the top arm, allowing the top arm elbow to break or bend forward from the force of this extremely fast strong pull! This places the major emphasis of the pulling action out at the end of the poles fulcrum (The top hand), allowing for the maximum bend of the pole and assist rock back. As the legs and hips are shot upwards, the center of gravity of the vaulter/pole system is on the poles fulcrum (the top hand ) and the pole bends even more!. The hips must rest with the line of the spine in true vertical, or even better, negatively inverted position, against the negatively inverted top arm (Chord of the pole).

Top hand pull Frames (Note strength of pull!) 3:54-3:55, Rock back Frames 3:55-3:57


Negative inversion was first demonstrated by the Master himself (Who else but Sergey Bubka?) in Paris on July 13, 1985, were he became the first human to clear 6 Meters (Bubkas first 6 Meter vault!) in a competitive event. I don't know at what point this may have been recognized, or if it was the result of Petrovs Plan, I just know that he did it! Why is this (so valuable to the outcome of the vault) not mentioned in Petrov's Model?

When the body of the vaulter rotates to inversion it can only go as far as the top arm (It will be stopped by the top arm). So in order for the body to rotate to true vertical or beyond vertical (negative Inversion) , the top arm must be beyond vertical.
Bubka accomplishes this by keeping his top arm in line with the chord of the pole (The straight line from his top hand to the butt of the pole. The Pole is still bent). Some vaulters accomplish this by moving the pole out away from the thighs.The body must be brought back to the top arm before it moves to vertical and the pole uncoils. It is imperative that the vaulter does not drive the top arm to vertical before the body can get there. So the top arm must stay beyond vertical throughout rock-back. If the top arm stays behind vertical, the line of the spine of the vaulter can come to true vertical, or even better, beyond (Negative Inversion), before the pole uncoils! This is ideal because the center of gravity of the vaulter and the vaulter pole system, extend downward from the poles ideal fulcrum (the top hand), along the chord of the pole, optimally loading it (keeping it bent)! This allows the vaulter time, to add even more kinetic energy into a truly vertical direction of the spine, with a very strong bottom and then a very strong top arm push toward the pit! The optimally loaded pole returns the vaulter in a Superior position (Truly vertical) producing an insane fly-away!

The majority of elite vaulters do not allow their top arm and body to go beyond vertical (Negative Inversion) and never achieve true vertical, before the pole uncoils. It is impossible for a rowing vaulter, or a tuck and shoot vaulter to achieve this ideal position.

Check out Bubka (First 6 Meter Vault) performing Negative Inversion for yourself. Write down these frames. Frames; :20, 1:33 and 1:55
Oh and max out the screen! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyzkuLMJFNg

One cannot over-emphasize the importance of the top hand push! This is agreed upon by everyone. In Bubka's famous jump, however, simply calling his final action a "push" does not do justice to his effort. Rather, Bubka makes his last effort his strongest, as it is the last opportunity to add energy to his fly-away. Perhaps the correct term for this action is a reverse "shot-put" of his entire body!

[b] Frames 5:11-5:16 and Frames 1:56-2:05


It is very important for the chest to be hollowed before throwing the arms back! Many vaulters make the mistake of throwing the arms back first, which forces the chest toward the crossbar.

Here is the best link I could find of Bubka's Famouse Jump, ( Maybe the best Vault in human history!) were I believe he demonstrates the above mentioned Model. Note I have made frame references for you throughout my Model so you can see for yourself. You may want to print this off before going to the video. Max out the screen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QribYk ... sults_main


I would like to add that the only fault that I could find with Bubka's famouse jump is that he could have done a better job of keeping his legs together, more vertical, and in better alignment with the body at fly-away. I believe this would have resulted in even greater bar clearance.
Every jot and every tittle adds up to more than just a little.

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PVDaddy
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Posts: 504
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Favorite Vaulter: Cornelius Warmerdam

Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:31 am

I realized I left an element out of the agenda that adds energy to the vaulter/pole system and that some other elements needed further description. I am posting the updated agenda on the next post.
Every jot and every tittle adds up to more than just a little.

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PVDaddy
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Posts: 504
Joined: Wed May 26, 2010 10:56 pm
Expertise: Former High School Vaulter, High School coach, College coach
Lifetime Best: 10.5 Ft
World Record Holder?: Renaud Lavillenie
Favorite Vaulter: Cornelius Warmerdam

Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:34 am

AGENDA 21 Joseph M. Maxwell

Abstract

The following pole vault model represents this author's attempt to describe and clarify what he feels are critical elements of what was perhaps the greatest vault in human history. Because this vault was performed by Sergey Bubka--the student of world famous coach Vitaly Petrov--this vault certainly represents the Petrov Model and Bubka's attempt at its perfection. This Agenda attempts to describe this single isolated vault and no two vaults are exactly alike, but are what Alan Launders so eloquently coined, a "one-off." No one can deny, however, that this "one-off," was one excellent vault! Because pole vaulting is indeed a continuous chain of events, with each event impacting the next, it goes without saying that if one has not perfected the former, they will not have the same set of circumstances in the latter. My objective is that this Agenda will stir up some new ideas that coaches and athletes might not have yet considered toward their attempts at perfecting their craft and/or to bring consensus to areas of the vault they thought to be true, but may have not yet employed in their training This Agenda describes some critical elements, Many of which are not mentioned in Petrov's Model, but, were demonstrated by Bubka, that this author believes are imperative, if one is to have a chance at vaulting 21 feet. I do believe there is one best model for the majority of vaulters and a great need for consensus among coaches and vaulters, if the Pole vault world is going to move forward and break a new world record.


Definitions:

Pole selection: a pole must be selected to meet the ideal resistance required to completely uncoil at true vertical at the exact time the vaulter begins fly-away (see Fly-away below for definition and proper pole selection).

Fly-away: Flyaway is defined as beginning at the moment the bottom hand leaves the pole.
The pole is no longer propelling the vaulter in this phase. The vaulter adds the last share of energy with the top-hand push, and then begins free-fall as gravity is now the only force in action.

Free Take off: A Free take of would be a take off, ( leaving the ground from the take of leg. Jumping ) without interference from the resistance of a coiled pole. Pole would be concave from its own weight or at minimum straight at plant.

Pole loading: Pole loading is the Kinetic energy generated during Run up that is transferred into the pole at Take off (causing it to bend and rotate to vertical) and stored as Potential energy which is later transferred to the vaulter as kinetic energy at Flyaway.

Negative Inversion: When the vaulter is upside down just prior to flyaway, with the angle of the spine to the left of (behind) vertical, leaning toward the runway. Becoming extra Inverted.


This author believes that the Petrov model describes the ideal Pole carry, Run up, and Plant (First Phase), it needs however, to be described in greater detail.

The following link is an excellent article Written by David Butler and describes the Active (Gravity) pole dop, 3 step Plant, and Free take off better than anything I have found. http://www.nacactfca.org/Butler%20pole% ... n'%204.doc

Petrov showing the proper position of the hands and arms during the last 2 steps of the plant and into take off, in order to achieve a Free take off, at at a speach he gave in Reno in 2005.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMUQaWfAx48&feature=gv

A vaulter must always strive for a Free take off into the stretched inverted C position. Frames 2:56-3:04

Pole loading: Pole loading begins the moment after take off. The vaulter at this stage of the vault must make no effort to pull or swing on the pole but must continue to reach (Stretch) for the sky, chest forward leading the way through the arms, with the bottom arm elbow relaxed, facing out, as the bottom arm is being taken upward toward the top hand, it must be straightened out (indication of no Pulling effort) into an elastic stretch of both shoulder girdles, allowing the full force of the run up speed and take off to be maximally loaded on to the Pole. When the force of the vaulters body is loaded onto the pole (from the top hand), the pole will bend, and the vaulters body will also bend, into the stretched inverted C position. This Places the vaulter in the most ideal position for the swing and allows it to occur elastically (immediately) with maximum effectiveness.

Frames 3:39-3:50

The majority of kinetic energy generated during the vault occurs at run up and is maximally transferred to the pole (Pole loading) with a Free take off into the stretched inverted C position, it is imperative that this phase of the vault be mastered!

The Major additions to the Petrov model (Beside what Butler in his article, and Petrov in his Reno speech, further clarify) this author is making in this model are in regards to the off-the-ground phase of the vault (second phase), and mainly concern the use of the Trail leg, Abdomen, and the Bottom and Top Hand.

I have attempted to identify EVERY ELEMENT, in the off-the-ground phase of the vault, THAT ADDS ENERGY TO THE POLE/VAULTER SYSTEM and they ARE ALL CRITICAL to achieve maximum bar height clearance!


Relaxation and Elevation of Trail leg: At the very end of Pole loading both legs must be momentarily relaxed allowing the trail leg to be elevated (heel toward the sky with knee bending) in order to increase the swing distance and speed of The Whip ( As if one were kicking a soccer ball).

Frames 3:43-3:47

The Whip: The most amount of energy added to the vault during the second (off-the-ground) phase is The Whip (Whipping up action of the trail leg). The whip begins immediately from the Elevated trail leg out of the Stretched inverted C, and continues to the top of the pole. All effort must be made to generate as much speed and energy throughout the whip as possible!

Frames 3:39-3:50

Abdomen Pull: There must be a very strong abdomen pull (Pelvic thrust) of the hips and legs, that begins the moment the whip (Trail Leg) comes out of the downswing (and into the upswing), in order to maximize whip speed and propulsion of the hips and legs upward into the upswing.

Frames 3:49-3:54

Use of the bottom hand:

The bottom hand performs both a pulling tension ( a downward tension created through the shoulder) and then a pushing action. Both add energy to the vault. Both actions are critical to this model.

The bottom hand must perform the pulling tension (A downward force created through the shoulder) at the appropriate time. The appropriate time to begin the pulling tension would be immediately after the Abdomen Pull in the whip and coincides at the exact time the vaulter breaks at the hips, the pulling tension must continue through inversion as the hips and legs are propelled upward. This adds speed to the whip and also gets the vaulter to inversion quicker out ahead of the uncoiling pole.

Frames 3:53-3:56

The bottom hand must perform a very strong push toward the pit! Just like the top hand does, but in this instance the wrist is bent around the pole. This positions the vaulter in the air (Fly-away has begun) for the turn and all important top hand push and adds critical energy to the fly-away (as it assist in adding additional vertical energy). The bottom hand release (after bottom hand push) must occur simultaneously with the final straightening of the pole. The fact that the vaulter is applying maximum downward pressure, while increasing his grip on the pole, at this perfect time, insures that the maximum amount of kinetic energy from the pole is transferred into the vaulters body.

Frames (Note timing of release) 5:03-5:11

It is very important to note the bottom hand puling tension and bottom hand push are not two separate entities. Conversely, the object is to seamlessly blend the bottom hand pull directly into the bottom hand push as the bottom hand crosses the plane of the chest. This changes the direction of the force exerted by the bottom hand from towards the body, to away from the body--aiding in the overall objective (going up) the entire time!

Laying back of the shoulders: The blend from the pull to the push takes place when the whip meets the top of the pole. This is when the shoulder must be laid back into inversion. This action serves as an additional lever, working together with the bottom hand push and greatly adds to the upward thrust of the hips! Similar action when rowing a boat.

Frames 4:32-4:44

Use of the top hand:

The top hand performs both a strong pulling action and then a strong pushing action. Both add energy to the vault. both actions are critical to this method.

The top hand pull begins simultaneously with the bottom hand pull (at the moment one breaks at the hips). They work together, similar to one swinging there hips to the top of a high bar. However, the major pulling effort must be made by the top arm, allowing the top arm elbow to break or bend forward from the force of this extremely fast strong pull! This places the major emphasis of the pulling action out at the end of the poles fulcrum (The top hand), allowing for the maximum bend of the pole and assist rock back. As the legs and hips are shot upwards, the center of gravity of the vaulter/pole system is placed on the poles fulcrum (The body is leaning back toward the top hand) and the pole bends even more!. The hips must rest with the line of the spine in true vertical, or even better, negatively inverted position, against the negatively inverted top arm (Chord of the pole).

Top hand pull Frames (Note strength of pull!) 3:54-3:55, Rock back Frames 3:55-3:57


Negative inversion was first demonstrated by the Master himself (Who else but Sergey Bubka?) in Paris on July 13, 1985, were he became the first human to clear 6 Meters (Bubkas first 6 Meter vault!) in a competitive event. I don't know at what point this may have been recognized, or if it was the result of Petrovs Plan, I just know that he did it! Why is this (so valuable to the outcome of the vault) not mentioned in Petrov's Model?

When the body of the vaulter rotates to inversion it can only go as far as the top arm (It will be stopped by the top arm). So in order for the body to rotate to true vertical or beyond vertical (negative Inversion) , the top arm must be beyond vertical.
Bubka accomplishes this by keeping his top arm in line with the chord of the pole (The straight line from his top hand to the butt of the pole. The Pole is still bent). Some vaulters accomplish this by moving the pole out away from the thighs.The body must be brought back to the top arm before it moves to vertical and the pole uncoils. It is imperative that the vaulter does not drive the top arm to vertical before the body can get there. So the top arm must stay beyond vertical throughout rock-back. If the top arm stays behind vertical, the line of the spine of the vaulter can come to true vertical, or even better, beyond (Negative Inversion), before the pole uncoils! This is ideal because the center of gravity of the vaulter and the vaulter pole system, extend downward from the poles ideal fulcrum (the top hand), along the chord of the pole, optimally loading it (keeping it bent)! This allows the vaulter time, to add even more kinetic energy into a truly vertical direction of the spine, with a very strong bottom and then a very strong top arm push toward the pit! The optimally loaded pole returns the vaulter in a Superior position (Truly vertical) producing an insane fly-away!

The majority of elite vaulters do not allow their top arm and body to go beyond vertical (Negative Inversion) and never achieve true vertical, before the pole uncoils. It is impossible for a rowing vaulter, or a tuck and shoot vaulter to achieve this ideal position.

Check out Bubka performing Negative Inversion for yourself. Write down these frames. Frames; :20, 1:33 and 1:55
Oh and max out the screen! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyzkuLMJFNg

One cannot over-emphasize the importance of the top hand push! This is agreed upon by everyone. In Bubka's famous jump, however, simply calling his final action a "push" does not do justice to his effort. Rather, Bubka makes his last effort his strongest, as it is the last opportunity to add energy to his fly-away. Perhaps the correct term for this action is a reverse "shot-put" of his entire body!

[b] Frames 5:11-5:16 and Frames 1:56-2:05


It is very important for the chest to be hollowed before throwing the arms back! Many vaulters make the mistake of throwing the arms back first, which forces the chest toward the crossbar.

Here is the best link I could find of Bubka's Famouse Jump, ( Maybe the best Vault in human history!) were I believe he demonstrates the above mentioned Model. Note I have made frame references for you throughout my Model so you can see for yourself. You may want to print this off before going to the video. Max out the screen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QribYk ... sults_main


I would like to add that the only fault that I could find with Bubka's famouse jump is that he could have done a better job of keeping his legs together, at fly-away. I believe this would have resulted in even greater bar clearance.
Every jot and every tittle adds up to more than just a little.

User avatar
PVDaddy
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Posts: 504
Joined: Wed May 26, 2010 10:56 pm
Expertise: Former High School Vaulter, High School coach, College coach
Lifetime Best: 10.5 Ft
World Record Holder?: Renaud Lavillenie
Favorite Vaulter: Cornelius Warmerdam

Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Fri Mar 08, 2013 10:20 am

Wow did anybody else notice?

I was mentally going over Buka's first 6 Meter vault ( The benefit one gets from visualization is AMAZING and will be discussed in the next topic of training methods), looking for all the elements described in agenda 21 (That he performed in his famous vault). When we (Me and Bubka. LOL) got to the part he was negatively inverted, I was saying to myself "Bottom hand Push, Top hand Push". I noticed that he didn't Top hand push very hard on this vault? I Thought to myself WOW, wonder what his bar clearance would have been on this vault if he had? Evidently he had the same thought and decided to push again, on a pole that wasn't there? Must be nice to have the time to perform two top hand pushes on the same vault AND STILL break the world record!
Oh the benefits of Negative Inversion!


Check it out! Frames :23-:25 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyzkuLMJFNg
Every jot and every tittle adds up to more than just a little.

User avatar
PVDaddy
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Posts: 504
Joined: Wed May 26, 2010 10:56 pm
Expertise: Former High School Vaulter, High School coach, College coach
Lifetime Best: 10.5 Ft
World Record Holder?: Renaud Lavillenie
Favorite Vaulter: Cornelius Warmerdam

Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Sat Mar 09, 2013 6:08 pm

Sorry didn't meen to post so fast! Was not finished addressing your very good questions and they get to the heart of what I am trying to convey in Agenda 21. Wish this was beeing discussed on that thread, but these are topics that must be addressed here also, if a vaulter is to ever "Get on the top of the Pole!" There is a BIG difference between getting to the top of the pole already flagged out (that's what most achieve and many dont even get that, most pull from underneath the pole), Vertical (only a few) and beyond vertical (far fewer still). Bubka is one of the few vaulters that is able to achieve this extreme (extreme does not imply bad) position. He is able to do it because his coaches concept of pole vaulting and his, are different then most. THEY EXPLOIT EVERY SINGLE OPPORTUNITY TO ADD ENERGY INTO THE SYSTEM AND THEY THINK OF THE ENTIRE VAULT AS ONE INTEGRATED SYSTEM! If we ever get away from this motive, the current world record is as good as gold. If we stay focused on it, I think it can be achieved, relatively soon. That's why I get so scared about even mentioning the push (or any active element) as a negative. No it is not the most important,but should never be discarded for that reason? Thats insanity! The Hungarians have a saying a "lot of little things add up to one big thing when put together"! Those words apply to pole vaulting more than anything I can think of!

So what else does Bubka do differently (how does he think?) then most to get there? We all know his run up and plant are spot on! I think many elite vaulters are there now too. You asked the question when does the swing end? Great question! In my Agenda I said the whip foot must be brought to the top of the pole. But is that were the whip ends? Is that how Bubka thinks about it? Does the swing ever stop? Why would we ever want to do that? Perhaps the correct way to think, is that the swing never ends, until you get off the landing pad! Why would you want to stop a body in motion (No negative inversion does not stop a body in motion. It's only a position in space that keeps the pole coiled better and longer and allows time and creates greater position for a more powerful vertical flyaway. The body is in continuous motion throughout)? Its this type of thinking that I'm trying to promote in agenda 21. Did you notice that I said in agenda 21, the bottom hand pull and bottom hand push are not separate entities but must be seamlessly blended with the whip? Did you notice how I said the laying back of the shoulders serves as an additional lever working together with the bottom hand push and greatly assist the propulsion of the hips? After the pole is correctly loaded (elevation of the trail leg takes place during pole loading), the whip is the core foundation of the second phase of the vault and adds the most energy. The pelvic thrust, bend at the hips while pulling with both arms (top arm mostly), rock back, laying back of the shoulders into full inversion while pushing with the bottom arm, and the top arm push ALL ADD ADDITIONAL CRITICAL ENERGY INTO ONE INTEGRATED SYSTEM! Petrov and Bubka understand this better then most, and fully exploit it. There is another thing they understand that many vaulters and coaches do not. Most vaulters pull to early telling the pole to uncoil and there bodies to bend. They are trying to add energy to the swing through a smaller muscle group=the arms. Bubka on the other hand adds energy to the whip through his largest muscle group=THE HIPS! This is a much more powerful and effective lever and the biggest reason he keeps the poll bent longer and is able to get on top of the pole (negative inversion) before it uncoils so well!
Every jot and every tittle adds up to more than just a little.

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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Sat Mar 09, 2013 7:06 pm

Watch this video Frames 1:15-1:32.

Notice the rotation of the whip around the hip joint.
Notice how well the pole continues to bend, and how high the bend is do to how he uses his hips. This is the block in the vault!
Notice that he does not pull until the hips break. Notice the strength of the top hand pull at this time.
Notice how the bottom hand pull and the laying back of the shoulders work together simultaneously.
Notice how he continues to use the hips to propel himself into inversion.
All working together into on integrated system!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyzkuLMJFNg
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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Fri Mar 15, 2013 2:42 am

In this post i would like to further elaborate on WHY negative inversion is important and HOW Bubka is able to achieve it?

As the vaulter begins the bottom hand push to help propel the hips and assist the turn, the pole is uncoiling and rotating toward vertical. All of these actions are forcing the vaulters body to rotate toward the crossbar. The spine of the vaulter will start to be forced toward (angled toward) the crossbar the moment the bottom hand push begins and this will continue through flyaway. This forward lean toward the crossbar WILL happen regardless of the vaulters inverted position (whether less then, vertical or beyond vertical)! The less beyond vertical you are, the more flagged out toward the crossbar you will end up! So it makes sense to begin the bottom hand push from a negatively inverted angle. I can't make it any more simpler, YOU WILL BE LESS FLAGGED OUT!

All of the same elements that make negative inversion possible are also the same elements that produce the best vaults. They include every element in the vault leading up to that position. We all know the importance of pole Cary, run-up, plant, and free take-off, and that the majority of energy is obtained and transferred to the pole at this time. So of course perfecting these things are critical!

The BIGGEST mistakes that most elite vaulters make and why they cant obtain negative inversion, is what they do (or do not do) after take-off.

The importance of chest penetration into the full body stretched invert-C position cannot be over-stressed. You must allow the swing to occur naturally at the top hand (The first axis of rotation. Same way the monkey swings on the branches) from inverted-C to active-I (when the body is straight, with heal extended pointing toward the pit).

Now the TAP (soviet learned system of the most efficient swinging method on the high bar) occurs, as the bottom hand must continue to be fully straightened ( This is THE BLOCK of the vault!) As the long extended pendulum swing of the leg (long levers deliver the most energy) is now elevated by the pelvic (Abdomen) thrust and use of the hip joint muscles (The strongest lever in the human body controlling that pendulum! THE WHIP COMES FROM THE HIP!), the axis of rotation is now transferred from the top hand to the swing leg hip joint. The bottom hand pulling tension through the shoulder, combined with a strong top hand pull (The poles fulcrum) must occur at this exact moment! The whip is extended by the hollowing out of the chest.

ANY pulling or rowing action that occurs prior to this does NOT add energy to the vault (Why I will never be able to wrap my head around the M640 Model?), it Destroys it (Tells the pole to prematurely uncoil and the body to prematurely tuck) .... and Petrov know this.

The vaulter is now in the L-position and beginning rock back to cover the pole. He has performed a strong top hand pull which has greatly assisted the propulsion of his hips upward and caused the pole to bend. He must maintain the bend in the pole by the backward lean and drive the lower body and legs toward the top hand (The axis of rotation has now changed from the hips to the shoulder joints). (Not drive the the top hand to the lower body like so many elite vaulters are incorrectly trained to do). If you drive the top hand to the lower body, the top arm will be driven out of its beyond vertical position and even less than vertical. THE POSITION OF THE BODY MIRRORS THE POSITION OF THE TOP ARM. The vaulters angle of inversion can only be as good as the angle of the top arm (It can go no further). This is the key to obtaining negative inversion. Bubka does not bring the top arm to the lower body, but lets the top arm stay in that backward leaned position, along the chord of the pole (The chord of the pole is the center of gravity of the pole/vaulter system) and instead brings the body to the top arm before he begins the bottom arm push. His superior flight path is Predetermined! Lastly I want to point out that because his bodies center of gravity is along the chord of the pole, he also achieves superior bend of the pole and therefore greater pole recoil. Another benefit of negative inversion!

I believe that what I have just explained to you as thoroughly and as simply (not easy because of all the elements involved in the vault and all the rational required to explain it) as I could, are entirely correct, and backed by good logic, and physics. I believe very few coaches (even among-st the elite) understand the benefits of how and why to obtain this position. Coach I hope I have thoroughly answered all your questions?

Watch the position of Bubkas top arm angle through rock back. It stays behind vertical with the chord of the pole.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyzkuLMJFNg
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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:57 am

IMPORTANT POINTS OF EMPHASIS for AGENDA 21


1) Perfect run up, pole Cary and plant into free take off.
We all know the importance of pole Cary, run-up, plant, and free take-off, and that the majority of energy is obtained and transferred to the pole at this time. So of course perfecting these things are critical!


The BIGGEST mistakes that most elite vaulters make and why they cant obtain negative inversion, is what they do (or do not do) after take-off.

2) Penetration, Penetration, Penetration! ( WITH NO PULLING OR ROWING!)
The importance of chest penetration into the full body stretched invert-C position cannot be over-stressed. You must allow the swing to occur naturally at the top hand (The first axis of rotation. Same way the monkey swings on the branches) from inverted-C to active-I
The key phrase here:To let the swing occur naturally at the top hand (The first axis of rotation. Same way the monkey swings on the branches) from inverted-C to active-I
ANY pulling or rowing action that occurs prior to this does NOT add energy to the vault (Why I will never be able to wrap my head around the M640 Model?), it Destroys it (Tells the pole to prematurely uncoil and the body to prematurely tuck) .... and Petrov know this.


3) THE TAP:
the tap (A swinging element in gymnastics used on the high bar or rings from a hollowed out position of the body (Inverse-C in PV) to take advantage of the stretch-reflex ability of the human body to add whip to the swing, like in a giant.) The tap begins out of inverse-C and connects to the active-I


4) THE BLOCK:
the bottom hand must continue to be fully straightened ( This is THE BLOCK of the vault!)
The block begins immediately after penetration in Inverse-C (When the bottom hand is over the head at 12 o'clock) and continues to just before the L-position.

5) BREAK IN THE HIPS:
The pelvic thrust, bend at the hips while pulling with both arms (top arm mostly), rock back, laying back of the shoulders into full inversion while pushing with the bottom arm, and the top arm push ALL ADD ADDITIONAL CRITICAL ENERGY INTO ONE INTEGRATED SYSTEM! Petrov and Bubka understand this better then most, and fully exploit it. There is another thing they understand that many vaulters and coaches do not. Most vaulters pull to early telling the pole to uncoil and there bodies to bend. They are trying to add energy to the swing through a smaller muscle group=the arms.[b] Bubka on the other hand adds energy to the whip through his largest muscle group=THE HIPS! This is a much more powerful and effective lever and the biggest reason he keeps the poll bent longer and is able to get on top of the pole (negative inversion) before it uncoils so well![/b]


And lastly the biggy!

6)TOP ARM ALWAYS STAYS WITH THE CHORD OF THE POLE! From Active-i through Inverted-I.
The vaulter is now in the L-position and beginning rock back to cover the pole. He has performed a strong top hand pull which has greatly assisted the propulsion of his hips upward and caused the pole to bend. He must maintain the bend in the pole by the backward lean and drive the lower body and legs toward the top hand (The axis of rotation has now changed from the hips to the shoulder joints). (Not drive the the top hand to the lower body like so many elite vaulters are incorrectly trained to do). If you drive the top hand to the lower body, the top arm will be driven out of its beyond vertical position and even less than vertical. THE POSITION OF THE BODY MIRRORS THE POSITION OF THE TOP ARM. The vaulters angle of inversion can only be as good as the angle of the top arm (It can go no further). This is the key to obtaining negative inversion. Bubka does not bring the top arm to the lower body, but lets the top arm stay in that backward leaned position, along the chord of the pole (The chord of the pole is the center of gravity of the pole/vaulter system) and instead brings the body to the top arm before he begins the bottom arm push. His superior flight path is Predetermined! Lastly I want to point out that because his bodies center of gravity is along the chord of the pole, he also achieves superior bend of the pole and therefore greater pole recoil. Another benefit of negative inversion!

The key to how Bubka is able to achieve negative inversion is how he dynamically Moves through the C-I-L positions, and how he brings the body to the top arm, that never leaves the chord of the pole.


.
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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby IAmTheWalrus » Wed Mar 20, 2013 11:57 am

ANY pulling or rowing action that occurs prior to this does NOT add energy to the vault


How can you make this claim? Pulling ABSOLUTELY adds energy to the vault. The athlete does muscular work (attained through the conversion of chemical potential energy to work) to speed their rotation and raise their COM. The work energy principle states that the work done by all forces acting on a particle equals the change in kinetic energy of the particle. If the vaulter is doing work, they are adding energy. The pull speeds rotation without shortening the radius (increase in angular momentum = increase in KE), and it raises the COM (increase in PE). You can say what you want about the pull's value in the vault and effect on penetration or pole bend (I would argue against it having much effect on the pole bend, but I won't discuss that here), but you cannot argue that it adds energy.
-Nick

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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby PVDaddy » Wed Mar 20, 2013 6:15 pm

IamtheWalrus, I did not say Pulling does not add energy to the vault.

I said under the subject category 2) Penetration (This is when the vaulter/pole system is being loaded by the energy generated from the run-up and take-off) that:
ANY pulling or rowing action that occurs prior to this does NOT add energy to the vault (Why I will never be able to wrap my head around the M640 Model?), it Destroys it (Tells the pole to prematurely uncoil and the body to prematurely tuck) .... and Petrov know this.

The emphasis here must be placed on chest penetration to allow the body to be fully stretched into the inverted-C position and the pole to be loaded by the top hand at which time the swing must be allowed to occur naturally fom inverted-C to Active-I with no pulling or rowing at this stage.

Of course pulling adds energy to the vault! It bends the pole and greatly assist in the upward propulsion of the hips. But its the timing of that pull that is important. It should be performed at the exact moment you break at the hips.
My Quote:
5) BREAK IN THE HIPS:
The pelvic thrust, bend at the hips while pulling with both arms (top arm mostly), rock back, laying back of the shoulders into full inversion while pushing with the bottom arm, and the top arm push ALL ADD ADDITIONAL CRITICAL ENERGY INTO ONE INTEGRATED SYSTEM!
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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby altius » Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:45 pm

I must congratulate PVDaddy for his attempts to clarify our understanding of this great event and I especially envy his ability as a touch typist – because it would take me at least a week to cover the ground he does in his posts.

However the way in which this issue has developed has left me feeling as though I am about to be run over by a Mack truck! I already know that I am surely heading for hell and damnation after this post – and that is just a threat from my wife - who believes (probably correctly) that I could be doing more useful things with my time like cleaning the car or painting something – it seems that there is always something that needs painting.

So to two of the key issues. The first is that PVDaddy believes that “negative inversion” is a new concept, something no one has ever considered before, and secondly, that he is the first to understand that the Petrov model is an integrated model, underpinned by the idea that “Many small things can add up to a big thing”.

Without detracting in any way from PVDaddy’s posts, I would like to suggest that both of these key ideas have been around since Bubka first emerged thirty years ago, and certainly since Petrov presented his ideas in Birmingham, England in 1985. They, along with other issues such as, Does the lower arm push or pull – and when - have certainly been raised and debated again and again on PVP. Unfortunately it is not easy for newcomers to this site to access these discussions and this can often lead them to the reasonable conclusion that they have never been dealt with before. It would certainly be a valuable contribution to PVP if someone would step up to index specific important topics so that they were more accessible to newcomers.

However for example if we take up the notion that “Many small things can make a big thing”- an important concept in understanding the Petrov model, you will find that in a post on Dec 21 advertising Altius clinics – I wrote
“The minimalist element stresses that
1. “Sok kicsi socra megy”. *
2. Training for the pole vault should be highly specific in nature.
3. All training and drills must contribute directly to the development of key elements of the model.”
*It is indeed a Hungarian saying but one that I did not translate at the time because I wanted to intrigue folk - but it simply means, “Many small things can add up to a big thing”.

While I cannot expect all the folk who visit this site to have read either BTB1 or BTB2 it seems reasonable to assume that anyone who wants to deal seriously with key issues here should at least review the literature, whether it be Petrovs writing, Bubkas presentations, Botcharnikov’s Manifesto or any book that deals with the Pole vault –even if you have to borrow a copy. That should not be too difficult because there are over 4500 copies – combined – of BTB1 and BTB2 around the world. It seems that it is being translated into Italian and there is just a possibility, now that a friend of mine is the technical director for track and field in China, that it may also be translated in that country. Hope so, could do with the money.

So what do we find?

On page 43 of BTB2 - written at least six years ago.
“Petrov’s aim was to develop a technical model which would enable vaulters to increase their grip heights and to use stiffer poles for he saw this as the secret to jumping higher. Thyere was no magic in this because pole vaulting is first and foremost about generating and redirecting energy efficiently. So he emphasised that pole vaulting was one continuous chain of energy input from the very first step until the athlete released the pole. This simple concept, summed up in the Petrov mantra “Move the pole always”, underpins a technical model that solves the problems of vaulting on flexible poles more effectively than any other.

Roma Botcharnikov coined the phrase the continuous chain model to describe this approach in which the athlete interacts with the pole throughout the vault and where there are no passive phases – that is phases where the athlete is not applying force to the pole. This notion of a continuous chain is illustrated both by Figure 7.2 and 7.7.”

On Page 53
“It is important to note that although we have broken Bubka’s technique down into its component parts, his model of pole vaulting must always be seen as sequential and interactive, with every phase depending on and melding with the previous phase. ------ More than any other model of pole vaulting the Petrov/Bubka model must be viewed as a WHOLE from the moment the athlete steps onto the runway until they shoot almost vertically from the top of the pole, over the bar and onto the pad.”

Then on Page 209
“Petrov’s ideas on the run up and plant are as rational as his approach to every other element of technique and reflect the completely integrated nature of his technical model. His comment that the pole vault begins with the first step is not a simple throw away line; it affirmed his view that the run up is the beginning of a continuous chain of energy input into the vaulter/pole system and that every aspect of the run up and plant must be structured to ensure a powerful upspringing take off from precisely the right sport , as shown in Figure 24.1.”

And on page 232
“Throughout this book we have stressed;
ß The integrated nature of the Petrov/Bubka model.
ß The notion of a continuous chain of energy
ß That each energy input phase creates the preconditions for the next phase.”

These are but four references to this notion of a continuous chain of energy input in BTB2 that I could easily put my hands on – but there are probably more because it is such an important concept.

However I have just noted that the paragraph from page 53 above was copied verbatim from page 23 of BTB1 which was written over ten years ago. That paragraph is followed in BTB1 by, “For example Bubka had a relatively narrow spacing between his hands as he gripped the pole at the start of his run up. He did this because the narrow grip allowed him to drive both hands very high at take off and then allowed him to swing more easily on the pole in what is traditionally called the ‘rock back’. However to control a long pole using a narrow grip he had to use a high angle pole carry at the start of his run and then to employ a carefully structured pole drop in order to control the falling lever. This confirms the tight link between major elements of his technique.” Sok kicsi socra megy again!

Here it is perhaps worth noting that my experience as a throws coach, especially in the shot and discus, had already – forty years ago - affirmed the importance of the sequential nature of techniques in track and field. As any discus coach knows – if you are off balance going into the turn at the back of the circle – you can only recover the throw, never maximize it.

Then with regard to “negative inversion”. I believe it is only another term – and possibly a confusing one - for “covering the pole”. The latter term identifies exactly what the athlete has to do, and it, along with the revolutionary idea of a pre jump take off, was one of the two elements of technique that Petrov believed were critical when he described his model to me in Canberra in August 1985. As I note in one of the books I made a huge mistake in not retaining the piece of paper on which he illustrated these two ideas. Because the pre jump was so revolutionary I wrote an article describing it for Modern Athlete and Coach in 1989 – an article that was published the following year in the German magazine Leichtathletic. I admit I never got round to doing the same thing with the notion of covering the pole. In part this was because I found introducing the pre jump take off relatively easy in drills but did not get the idea of covering the pole until we really understood the mechanics of the swing.

Here is what Petrov had to say on the notion of covering the pole as quoted on page 267 of BTB2,
“The rock back should be done by simultaneously shifting the body parts – legs up shoulders down. This puts the athlete into position to ensure that the energy of the recoil is directed almost vertically through the centre of mass of the vaulter who also straightens upwards along the pole.

The rock back and upswing must be completed before the pole begins to straighten, the rock back and upswing is considered complete when the vaulter has managed to cover the arc of the pole with his hips and legs; while the legs serve as a continuation of the upper end of the pole.”

AND
“Covering the arc of the pole with his hips and legs, while the legs somehow serve as the continuation of the upper end of the pole. It may be better to think of covering the bent pole. This delays the recoil of the pole, maintains the bend fractionally longer and lets the vaulter/pole system move forward more quickly. In essence it allows the vaulter to get into the best possible position to exploit the recoil of the pole.”

Figures 27.17a-c on the preceding page (266) are three stills from the best ever example of Bubka actually executing this movement. They are accompanied by five examples of four of my athletes ATTEMPTING to replicate these positions. Note that 27.16b shows Lauren Eley who had been vaulting for less than two years at that point.

Similar stills and sequences are shown throughout the book -
For example figures 7.6/7.5 -7.10d - 7.11a-c - 8.1 - 8.21 - 9.6 - 9.11 - 9.10 -10.4 -10.14 -12.4 -15.7 -15.9. But Page 174 shows the best example – this was taken from the black and white film of great vaulters of that era that Sean brown has available.

I have only ever been a messenger for Petrov – and he has thanked me publicly for spreading his ideas. This is why there are so many quotes from him in all of my work. I can only repeat that my interpretation of his ideas leads me to believe that, while is concerned about every detail of technique, he was fundamentally committed to the importance of achieving a free take off and then ‘covering the pole’ as fast as possible. I had the sense that if these elements were mastered the rest took care of itself. However others who have spent time with him may have different views - I hope we will see them on pvp. Because I know that even after sixty years I am merely a work in progress –just like the beginners I have returned to teaching.

Finally I would say – yet again – that lack of technical knowledge is not the critical factor in the success or failure of vaulters to reach the highest level. By and large it is the lack of support necessary for them and their coaches to commit themselves to training. This is a problem in many countries. It is interesting the note that the most successful male and female vaulters in OZ – Hooker and Boyd - were fortunate enough to have parents who had both been international athletes and so understood the demands involved. In Britain, Holly Bleasedale and her original coach were helped by a wealthy benefactor so they could remain independent of the official system. So with the USA the wealthiest country on the planet why is it not possible to approach some of your patriotic zillionaires to put a – relatively - tiny amount into supporting the sport ; surely some of them must have been athletes at some time?

As a footnote I would refer folk to another post in the coaches section in which I suggest that many of the male athletes at the NCAA indoor meet did not appear to be employing the basic principles of the Petrov model – in terms of the pole carry, plant and free take off or covering the pole. Take a look and tell me if you see any evidence of a common technical model with these talented athletes.
Its what you learn after you know it all that counts. John Wooden

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Re: AGENDA 21 (Final draft)

Unread postby grandevaulter » Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:21 pm

altius wrote: that I could be doing more useful things with my time like cleaning the car or painting something

I don't know any track coaches with clean cars. So don't worry about that one. Try to grind out another book or two. I'm beginning to be a fan of Englisch Literature. You are almost as good as James Herriot. Only a Brit could write 309 pages of technical material and still make it entertaining. Then some folk can write three pages and make it painstakingly dry.


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