Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

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Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby rainbowgirl28 » Wed Jul 24, 2013 12:27 pm

http://en.ria.ru/sports/20130723/182385 ... After.html

Record-Breaking Pole-Vaulter Isinbayeva to Retire After Championship

Yelena Isinbayeva
© RIA Novosti. Ekaterina Chesnokova
22:58 23/07/2013

MOSCOW, July 23 (R-Sport) - Two-time Olympic pole vault champion and world record holder Yelena Isinbayeva announced Tuesday that she would retire after the world championships in Moscow next month.

The 31-year-old made the statement immediately after winning the Russian nationals with a leap of 4 meters 75 centimeters.
“My career will finish 100 percent at the world championships,” Isinbayeva said. “For me it will be a nostalgic moment, I should get pleasure from this performance and I will try to show the best I can.”

She is competing for a seventh world gold medal next month in Moscow, where the championships will be held from August 10 through 18.

After winning bronze at last year's London Olympics, Isinbayeva said she would chase another Olympic medal in Rio de Janeiro in 2016, but first wanted to have a child.

She recounted on Tuesday a conversation she had had with her fellow pole vaulters on the topic.

"They said: 'How is this happening? You said you'd stay until Rio.' I answered: 'No, I'll be 10 years older than everyone there, so you do it yourselves. Continue my work."

Isinbayeva set her first world record in 2003 and has held the overall pole vault world record unbroken since 2004. She set the current record at a Diamond League event in Zurich in August 2009, jumping to 5 meters 6 centimeters.

Last year, she set her final record, an indoor world best of 5 meters 1 centimeter in Stockholm.

She won the Olympic Games in Athens 2004 and triumphed four years later in Beijing.

Russian Athletics Federation chief Valentin Balakhnichev told R-Sport that he would welcome Isinbayeva to join his team or even replace him as the country’s top athletics official.

“I think Lena Isinbayeva is such a great athlete that I’m eagerly waiting for her to work with us at any level,” Balakhnichev said. “If she wants to be the president, let her be the president, I will support her in this decision.”

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby Lynxyara » Sat Jul 27, 2013 7:40 am

To be precise, Isinbayeva said, she may participate in two stages of Diamond League after Moscow World Championships, then she will break her sports career. Participation in Rio Olympic Games is under question. Isinbayeva dont decide it yet, but believes that it is possible if she will wish it.

http://www.vesti.ru/only_video.html?vid=524551

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby rainbowgirl28 » Tue Aug 06, 2013 12:24 am

http://rbth.ru/arts/sport/2013/08/04/is ... 28637.html


Isinbayeva prepares for her last pole vault

August 4, 2013 Anna Kozina, special to RBTH

Yelena Isinbayeva has made plans to retire from top-level sports more than once before. She announced her intention to end her career again in July, during the Russian athletics championships. The queen of pole vaulting is planning to retire in style—something to watch out for at the August world championships in Moscow.

Yelena Isinbayeva’s appearance in Moscow was an event. What made the double Olympic champion miss a stage of the Diamond League in London and compete instead in the national championships, which she had missed for 11 years in a row? It was all so that she could try out the pole-vaulting area at Luzhniki, where the world athletics championships will start on Aug. 10.

Isinbayeva walked away empty-handed from the previous two summer tournaments—in Berlin in 2009 and Daegu in 2011—destroying the myth of the unbeatable champion and record holder. Her failure at the winter world indoor championships in Doha in 2010 could be added to this list. Now, the Moscow competition is an attempt to finish her career in style.

At this point, however, the example of Sergei Bubka comes to mind. He was the Seoul 1988 Olympic champion, 36-time world record holder and an inspiration for Yelena. However, in 2000, at the age of 37, he went to the Olympics in Sydney and left Australia without even clearing the starting height.

Another famous Russian athlete, Olympic long-jump champion Tatyana Lebedeva, who was unable to get into the world championships and fulfil her dream of ending her career at Luzhniki, made a very accurate observation: “There’s always the desire to retire from your sport in style, but it’s very difficult to do that."

"You’re already getting old, but in your head you remember all the movements, and there’s a crazy motivation, but you’re not physically capable. But sport is your whole life, and so sometimes you can’t simply up and retire at the right time,” she added.

When Isinbayeva was talking to journalists after her victory (4.75 meters) at the Russian championships, she could not get her story straight. She told some that she would be taking a break after the world championships and having a baby (and would possibly return to sport for the 2016 Olympics in Rio), but told others that she was never going to pick up a pole again. A RBTH correspondent heard the latter with her own ears, and this has been considered the official version of Isinbayeva’s story.

The inconsistency of Isinbayeva’s statements is similar to the rollercoaster of her results. In 2009, in the final of the world championships, Yelena was unable to clear a single height, but she set her 27th world record (5.06 meters) in the fifth round of the Golden League in Zurich. In 2011, she had no success at the world championships in Doha. In 2012, she set an indoor world record of 5.01 meters at the Grand Prix event in Stockholm, but, at the Olympic Games, she only managed to clear a height of 4.70 meters, collecting a bronze medal in the process.
Will Moscow be Isinbayeva’s swan song? And if so, what will it sound like?

“The world championships are a special competition. Half the stands will probably be filled by my friends and relatives. They’ll want to see my performance, because it will be the final world championships of my career,” said Isinbayeva. “They’ll clap, and that will be their way of thanking me for everything I’ve done, whatever the result is. But I promise I’ll keep fighting to the end.”

When competing, Isinbayeva sticks to a special tactic: The first height is a warm-up, the second is the winner, and the third is a record. At Yelena’s request, the pole-manufacturing firm began making poles with a finish in different colors. Isinbayeva chose pink for her first height, blue for her winning height and gold for her record height.

“There could have been a different result at the Olympics in London too [Isinbayeva only won bronze], but I was too jittery there. So, when I go out into the pole-vault sector in the stadium in Moscow, my watchword will be: ‘Whatever happens is for the best.’ You know, when you’re 31, you see things differently to the way you do when you’re 20. But I feel that my potential is huge. The main thing is for everything to come together on the day,” Isinbayeva said.

Despite the fact that Isinbayeva was smiling and joking in Luzhniki, it is clear from all her answers that she is not only training, but also thinking a lot about her life in sports and the disappointments of recent years. She is no longer the same Isinbayeva who could easily clear any height. This is probably even a bit sad and worrying for her, even if hidden behind a joyful mask.

“When I retire, I’ll probably have a good cry first, and then I’ll make a film about my victories,” Isinbayeva told journalists. “I don’t even know how many there have been. The way it worked out was that I won, then forgot, then won again and forgot again. I only know how many records I set: It was 28, because people count them. If you think about it, I had so many wins and they were so striking. At my best, I was setting eight world records a year. As you get older, you understand how valuable these achievements are.”

Strange as it seems, Isinbayeva does not watch her rivals. “I’m not interested in that. What they’re doing now is what I was doing a long time ago. They’re going where others have already been. But it was I who showed that everything is possible,” the champion said.

Yelena is right about something: If she had not set another indoor world record of 5.01 meters, American Jennifer Suhr would not have been able to beat it. The new world record has been 5.02 meters since March 2013. Suhr has not yet managed to clear 5.07 meters outside, but she has thrown down the gauntlet. Just like at the Olympics in Beijing and London (which the American won), Suhr will be the Russian’s main rival although, if truth be told, Isinbayeva is her own main rival.

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby BruceFlorman » Tue Aug 13, 2013 4:32 pm

From http://www.allsportinfo.ru/index.php?id=74673
Честно сказать, подсознательно я думала, что это моё последнее выступление. Я хотела оставить хороший след. И я показала достойный результат, выиграла золотую медаль. Теперь, если не получится вернуться, буду знать, что ушла с чистым сердцем.

I'm not a native speaker of Russian, but I translate that as...
Speaking honestly, I subconsciously thought that this was my final appearance. I wanted to leave a good mark. And I showed a decent result, won the gold medal. Now, if my return doesn't turn out, I'll know that I left with a pure heart.

It won't surprise me if she does hang up her spikes for good at the end of the season. I'll miss her, but I'm happy that she's leaving on a high note. :rose:

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby cdmilton » Wed Aug 14, 2013 10:21 am

She will be out for 18 months after having a baby according to her after her win yesterday.

http://www.flotrack.org/coverage/251036 ... not-retire
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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby BruceFlorman » Wed Aug 14, 2013 11:42 am

It's been awhile since I've done one of Lena's Russian interviews, but here's my translation of http://www.allsportinfo.ru/index.php?id=74677
01:01 14.08.2013 – World Athletics Championship 2013
Elena Isinbaeva: I won because the world championship is at home
Today, 13 August, in Moscow, the fourth day of the World Athletics Championship concluded. Russia’s two-time Olympic champion, Elena Isinbaeva became a three-time world champion in the pole vault. Elena spoke about her triumph and more, with “All Sport” special correspondents Vladimir Ivanov and Maria Vorobyova.

- Before the competition, I said that victory would be awarded for a height of 4.90 to 4.95 meters – recalled Elena Isinbaeva. – I was going into the world championship with no recent brilliant victories, or even the season’s world lead. But I knew that “Luzhniki” would bolster me; that all of the audience’s energy would be for me – and today it really helped. I won because the world championships are taking place at home. My family, and my coach, Evgeniy Trofimov, were in the stands. I officially declare that he resurrected me. Today’s victory happened only thanks to him and our work together.

- What did you discuss for so long with Trofimov after the unsuccessful first attempt at your 4.65 m starting height?
- I suggested to Evgeniy Vasilievich that I pass this height, since I felt just great – just the pole had been too soft. But my coach said it wasn’t worth the risk. Although I myself was very worried.

- Now will you tell us what you discuss with your poles?
- Thus far I still haven’t left the sport, so it’s too early to reveal (my) secrets. When I hang up my spikes, maybe I’ll tell.

- Earlier, during competitions, you constantly hid under a blanket, but now your behavior is very liberated, communicating with the stands.
- I’ve had a change in attitude toward the competition and my competitors. Earlier, I was in a cocoon, I thought that everyone around was jumping better than me. I came up with this on my own – and yet still believed in this rubbish. Then, at the start of this season, I took off my cap and blanket, and realized that the girls are trying, jumping – but not flying. Then I realized that things weren’t as bad as I’d imagined. So I just dropped the whole camouflage, seeing the real balance of power.

- Were you pleased by how the stands supported you?
- Today at the stadium I got the all-time best support of my career. This was my native audience, my native home! If last year’s Olympic Games had been held here, the results would have been completely different. That’s not to say that I’ve had poor support in other countries, but I felt like today absolutely everyone was pulling for me. I felt such energy and emotion, which resulted in the gold medal.

- Lena, can you compare your Olympic victories in Athens 2004, and Beijing 2008, with winning the world championship title in Moscow?
- It’s very difficult to compare. In Athens and Beijing I won as the clear favorite. The road from Athens to Beijing was not as rough as the route I traveled to these world championships. Then I was winning all the competitions, setting world records, and didn’t know the meaning of defeat! Winning the gold today, I can say with confidence: this medal is the dearest to me. On the way from Beijing to (my) victorious home world championship, I’ve had so many problems, defeats, complications and injuries!.. I completely lost faith in my own strength, I was simply desperate, (and) sometimes the thought crept in: maybe it’s really time for me to leave? The training didn’t stick, the jumping didn’t come off, everything simply fell apart and collapsed. But then I started working again with Evgeniy Vasilevich Trofimov, who gave me confidence in myself, and hope that I could do it all again! He just promised that returning to my previous level, we’d again win the champion’s title, that I’d certainly become number one! I simply needed to be patient. And beginning in 2010, we worked and endured together. Without regard for anything else. Without listening to the words addressed to us – the fact that everyone around said that Isinbaeva’s era was over, that Isinbaeva had blown up. I’ve heard to so much, suffered so many insults, but on the other hand, this spurred me on. Once people are talking, it means they’re waiting for something, and once they’re waiting, it means that I can do it! Therefore, I’m deliriously happy that Evgeniy Vasilivich and I proved to the whole world that Isinbaeva’s era has not only come again, but didn’t conclude at all!

- When did you start your training after the Olympic Games in London?
- This was a very difficult period for me. After London I told Evgeniy Vasilievich: that’s all; I’m leaving; I no longer have either the strength or emotion; psychologically, I just can’t imagine how I can continue to train. Before London, I still had some hope that I could win those Games, but once on the field, I realized that I was already just up to the light. [note: “up to the light” is an idiomatic phrase in Russian, meaning “I don’t care anymore”. Another translation might be “I was already just at my wits end.”] I was already so sick of everything, that I had nothing to jump with; I had no emotion. We began to prepare for the winter season, and I just came and said: I don’t want to anymore. Then Evgeniy Vasilievich said, “If you don’t want to, you don’t have to. How much rest do you need?” I replied that I wouldn’t jump all winter. The wisdom of my coach is such that he never forces me to do what I don’t want to. He simply guides me. He asked me whether I’d come to train? And when I came for workouts, he gradually approached me and suggested: maybe some running? Maybe some swinging? And thus gradually, unobtrusively, he didn’t let me get too out of shape. And in March he suggested that I start jumping. Initially I refused. But he stood his ground: maybe just give it a try? And I tried. And we began to notice that I was gaining form. Then the injury occurred. I went through rehabilitation, after which the pain still hasn’t completely subsided, but I was able to continue training and jumping.

- Do you already know what you’ll do with your life after sports?
- Life after sports won’t be so bright. There won’t be such emotion. There won’t be victories. There won’t be anthems played in my honor! Sure, there will still be some vital victories. The birth of a child is also a huge accomplishment, given from above. I’ll have to learn about family life too, as this will be a new experience. I now need to learn how to be a girl who doesn’t have to fight for everything. But knowing myself, I can’t imagine how I can live without fighting. I can’t even imagine what I’ll do once I’m walking around pregnant! (laughter)

- Lena, tell us more about your wedding!
- To be honest, like always, I’m running ahead of the train! My fiancé is in shock. He asks me not to discuss the wedding; not to mention that we’re planning to have a baby. He says – you first have to get pregnant! Ah, of course. I’ve already told everyone that I’m going to get pregnant, and get married soon, although the date isn’t yet known. But so far we’ve had neither a proposal, nor an attempt to become pregnant! (laughter) As soon as I know the details myself, I’ll share them with everyone.

- What are your plans now for the next few days?
- We’re planning to celebrate such that all of Moscow will “buzz”! I’m afraid to imagine what will happen now. We’ll note all the clubs, go down to every restaurant – in short, we’ll be out on the town without constraints. (laughter)

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby Sombrerero loco » Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:12 am

it was an amazing contest for her, specially considering how her season was. she should be proud, not only because of how high she jumped, but because she looked really solid

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby hardflex » Tue Aug 20, 2013 12:18 pm

I don't think she realizes how much of a change children will have on your life. It sounds like she had a tough enough time getting motivated without children, not to mention the changes the long layoff will make on her physical conditioning. Couple that with her age and the pull of the family and its a tough road. Maybe if there is a big money contract involved it could make a difference but seeing what happened to Brad Walker (same age) I think she is done.

What is the world record for a Female vaulter after children? Anyone know? Are there any World Class Competitors that have children now.

I looked today at the entry's for Stockholm on Thurs. Jenn, Sylva, Murer and Spiegleberg and others are entered. I wish they could get another shot at Isi, it would be good theater and sustain interest in the sport. How hard can it be, you're still in shape and now rested. Go mix it up.... for the fun of it ! It's not like it will negatively affect next year.

Alas, won't happen. Somehow it never does in Track and Field,

This has been a blah year for vaulting. Take Lavillinie and Holzdep out of the mix and Isi's Moscow win and the rest is just lukewarm at best.

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby rainbowgirl28 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 1:53 pm

I think that she is also really involved with Russian politics, so she has plenty of other things to keep her busy once kids enter the mix, I don't see her coming back either. Her anti-gay comments probably won't matter much to her Chinese shoe sponsor, but it's going to affect her marketability elsewhere.

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby canag » Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:26 am

Not sure about doing politics in Russia, her career plan does not start very well if that is her target:

In comments that might upset many Russians and President Vladimir Putin, who is trying to whip up patriotism to rally support after protests, the athlete said her long-revered home city of Volgograd was now impoverished and in decline.

"In Volgograd I'll have a lot of commitments but I want to live in Monaco," Isinbayeva was quoted as saying by the Russian newspaper Argumenty i Fakty newspaper on Thursday.

"What can you do here, in the city, when Volgograd is simply poor? The city has become awful and old. It's deteriorated. The roads are terrible."


source: Reuters at http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/08/2 ... LY20130822

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Re: Isinbayeva to retire after Moscow

Unread postby hardflex » Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:04 pm

Results from Stockholm DN Galan meet.


POS ATHLETE COUNTRY MARK POINTS
Details 1 Silke SPIEGELBURG GERGER 4.69 4
Details 2 Yarisley SILVA CUBCUB 4.59 2
Details 3 Fabiana MURER BRABRA 4.59 1
Details 4 Jennifer SUHR USAUSA 4.59
Details 5 Anastasia SAVCHENKO RUSRUS 4.49
Details 5 Jirina PTÁCNIKOVÁ-SVOBODOVÁ CZECZE 4.49
Details 7 Lisa RYZIH GERGER 4.49
Details 8 Angelica BENGTSSON SWESWE 4.39
Details


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